Planting Basics​

 

 

                                                        Planting Guidelines

 

 

-Plant in early Spring, when the soil is moist and workable.

-April and May are the most suitable months in the Northeast.

NOTE:

*Check with your local Cooperative Extension for area specific planting guidelines.

*Request that the vines be shipped to arrive within a few days prior to planting (see Shipping Guidelines).

*After arrival, store the vines in a cool place (above 40 degrees Fahrenheit) and keep the roots moist at all times.

*Place the roots into water (bathtub, pond, stream, or bucket) for one to two days before planting, allowing the vine to soak up reserves.

 

-Leave the roots as long as possible, because fine (thin) roots produce many rootlets quickly.

NOTE:

*Pruned back roots regenerate rootlets primarily at the cut surfaces, and larger roots regenerate rootlets slower.

*The roots store most of the vine’s reserves for growth. Any reduction in reserves will reduce the potential growth during the first year.

 

-Grafted vines should have the graft union located at about the level of the loose soil in the field.

NOTE:

*Placement should be about 2 inches above the soil level.after it has settled.

 

-Make sure that the soil to root contact is good by compressing the soil around the roots.

NOTE:

*This is best accomplished by stepping on the soil around the planted vine with your heel.

 

-Immediately after planting, cover the vine completely with loose soil (see Hill Up!)

NOTE:

*This will protect the vine from frost injury and from drying out.

*Nursery vines have been stored above freezing temperatures for the winter and are not cold hardy (below 30 degrees Fahrenheit).

 

-We do not recommend planting in the Fall.

  ​

Planting by Hand:

 

NOTE:

*If planting into loose/recently tilled soil, dig a trench 10 inches deep and 2 feet long.

*If digging into settled/non-tilled soil, make a trench 8 inches deep.

 

-Place the vine into the hole/trench with the roots fanning out to each side of the vine.

-Back fill the hole with 4 inches of soil and then press down onto the roots to ensure good soil to root contact.

NOTE:
*This is best accomplished by lightly stomping on the soil in the hole.

 

- Back fill the rest of the hole, making sure that you completely cover the vine.

NOTE:

*This loose soil will protect the vine from drying out and from frost injury.

 

-Once the vine has started growing (the shoots will start to grow up through the loose soil) and any risk of a late frost has past, then carefully pull the hill of soil away from the vine to expose the graft union.

 NOTE:

*-If you plan on using protective devices, such as grow tubes, this is the time when they should be installed.

Planting with an Auger:

 

-Use as large an auger as possible, 12 inches diameter or larger is best.

NOTE:

*If smaller than 12 inches, make 2 holes next to each other and use a shovel to connect them.

*If planting into loose/recently tilled soil, auger a hole 10 inches deep.

*If digging into settled/non-tilled soil, make your auger dig a hole 8 inches deep.

 

-Place the vine into the hole with the roots fanning out to each side of the vine.

NOTE:

*If the hole is not wide enough, place the trunk of the vine to one side of the hole and have the roots fan out from there.

 

-Back fill the hole with 4 inches of soil and then lightly stomp on the soil to ensure good soil to root contact.

 

-Back fill the hole the rest of the way, making sure to completely cover the vine.

NOTE:

*This loose soil over top of the vine provides protection against frost injury and from drying out.

 

-Once the vine has started growing (the shoots will start to grow up through the loose soil) and the risk of a late frost has past, carefully pull the loose soil away from the vine exposing the graft union.

NOTE:

*If you are planning on using protective devices, such as grow tubes, this will be the time to install them.

 

NOTE:

*One of the most common mistakes with auger planting is to make a deep hole, fill it partway back, and then plant the vine. This technique frequently causes the soil beneath the vine to settle, resulting in poor soil to root contact. This technique can also cause the entire vine to settle, making it impossible to keep the graft union above ground level (which leads to scion rooting).

Planting with a Tree or Vine Planter:

 

This planting technique allows for rapid planting while still maintaining good planting quality.

NOTE:

*Planting into loose/recently tilled soil, adjust the depth of your planting plow for a 10 inch digging depth.

*If planting into settled/non-tilled soil, make your trench 8 inches deep.

 

-Place the vine into the hole with the roots fanning out to each side of the vine.

NOTE:

*These machines also have wheels that press the soil around the roots. We have found that it is best to follow these wheels "heeling” the trench to be sure that there is good soil to root contact.

*This is best accomplished by stepping on the trench with the heel of your shoe on each side of the vine.

 

- Completely cover the vine with soil using either a shovel or a hilling up machine.

NOTE:

*This loose soil will provide protection from drying out and from frost injury.

 

-Once the vine has started to grow (the shoots will start to grow up through the loose soil) and any risk of a late frost has past, carefully pull the soil around the vine away exposing the graft union.

NOTE:

*If you are planning on using any kind of protective devices, such as grow tubes, now will be the time to install them.

                       First Three Years

 

 

 

 AMBERG  GRAPEVINES​